Nine Companies Tied to PRISM, Obama Will Be Smacked With Class-Action Lawsuit Wednesday

June 12, 2013

Former Justice Department prosecutor Larry Klayman amended an existing lawsuit against Verizon and a slew of Obama administration officials Monday to make it the first class-action lawsuit in response to the publication of a secret court order instructing Verizon to hand over the phone records of millions of American customers on an “ongoing, daily basis.”

Klayman told U.S. News he will file a second class-action lawsuit Wednesday in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia targeting government officials and each of the nine companies listed in a leaked National Security Agency slideshow as participants in the government’s PRISM program.

According to the slideshow, the PRISM program allows government agents direct, real-time access to the servers of nine major tech companies, including AOL, Apple, Facebook, Google, Microsoft, PalTalk, Skype, Yahoo! and YouTube.

 


Inside America’s $1.9billion data mine: How all your private details will soon be stored in this vast NSA nerve center in Utah Valley

June 9, 2013

You want to run for what office? Let me see what the data mine has for you … Do you have a section for Weiner pictures?

Mail Online reports …

The personal data and private online conversations that the National Security Administration is accused of mining could be stashed in a one million square-foot, $1.9 billion facility in the Utah Valley.

Concerns over what the government will store at the Utah Data Center have been reinvigorated by the revelation that U.S. intelligence agencies have been extracting audio, video, photos, e-mails, documents and other information to track people’s movements and contacts.

Apple, Facebook, Microsoft, Google, Yahoo, YouTube, Skype, AOL and the lesser known Internet company PalTalk are all involved with the PRISM program, which the government insists is for national security.

The Utah Data Center which is being constructed on Camp Williams on the Salt Lake-Utah County line will be completed in October – but officials have been tight-lipped about what will be stored there.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2337420/Utah-Data-Center-The-million-square-foot-Utah-data-mining-facility-built-NSA.html#ixzz2VfdN3W00
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

 


Why The Government Leaked PRISM

June 7, 2013

Too bad they weren’t monitoring the people who blew up the Boston Marathon.

Oops sorry didn’t mean to offend the Muslim Terrorists.

Politico reports …

The Washington Post has published a remarkable report showing that the National Security Agency and the Federal Bureau of Investigation have been monitoring the central servers of major Internet companies — Microsoft, Yahoo, Google, Facebook, PalTalk, AOL, Skype, YouTube and Apple — and “extracting audio, video, photographs, e-mails, documents and connection logs that enable analysts to track a person’s movements and contacts over time.”

Why did a government source leak information of this program, dubbed “PRISM,” to the Post? What follows is perhaps the most chilling paragraph I’ve read to date about U.S. government surveillance:

Firsthand experience with these systems, and horror at their capabilities, is what drove a career intelligence officer to provide PowerPoint slides about PRISM and supporting materials to The Washington Post in order to expose what he believes to be a gross intrusion on privacy. “They quite literally can watch your ideas form as you type,” the officer said.

In the wake of last night’s Guardian report about the NSA’s collection of Verizon phone user metadata, the New York Times editorial board argued that the Obama administration “has now lost all credibility” in defending its abuses of executive power. That was before the report about PRISM, which unlike the Verizon metadata, includes surveillance of user content.

Read more at politico.com …

There is now one oozing out of everywhere, where will it end.

THEY CAN NOW COLLECT LITERALLY EVERYTHING ON EVERYONE … Evil People do evil with other people’s confidential information. And evil is afoot in our Big Government,

Hey low information voters, you now understand what your parents were talking about, to you about Big Government TYRANNY … This is what it looks like. It was not fiction.

 


Email Down

February 15, 2012

Email stumbles in digital paradigm shift The use of email has plunged by more than 30% in the last year among consumers under the age of 24, owing to the increased use of texting and Facebook to stay in touch.

That’s one of the eye-opening paradigm shifts identified in a must-read report from comScore on the fast-changing state of the digital universe.

A primary activity among wired individuals since the arrival of the Internet, email use in the last 12 months fell by more than 30% for those under the age of 24 and stayed absolutely flat among those aged 24-44, according to the audience measuring service. As illustrated below, only those aged 45-54 are pecking out more emails today than they were a year ago.

The reason, of course, is that a growing number of people are communicating via Facebook and/or text messages on their mobile phones. Many, of course, also are chatting on the Facebook apps on their smart phones.

The rapid shift in one-on-one communication is not the only disruptive trend noted in the comScore study.

Traditional portals like Yahoo, MSN and AOL are “conceding ground to Facebook and other social networks,” said comScore. Noting that portals represented 16.7% of time on site in December vs. 16.6% for Facebook and its brethren, comScore said social sites are on track to “soon declare supremacy over portals.”

Putting its growing traffic to good use, Facebook last year became the top publisher of digital display advertising. Facebook ran more than 1.3 trillion ad impressions, as compared with 529 billion at Yahoo, 215 billion at Microsoft and 174 billion at Google.

While Google remains the king of search advertising, comScore notes its vulnerability, saying:

“Advertising on Facebook – which combines many of the attributes of search such as granular targeting, small ad formats and self-purchased ad buys – presents a unique offering for many marketers looking to bridge their search and display advertising.”

Email stumbles in digital paradigm shift

 The use of email has plunged by more than 30% in the last year among consumers under the age of 24, owing to the increased use of texting and Facebook to stay in touch.

That’s one of the eye-opening paradigm shifts identified in a must-read report from comScore on the fast-changing state of the digital universe.

A primary activity among wired individuals since the arrival of the Internet, email use in the last 12 months fell by more than 30% for those under the age of 24 and stayed absolutely flat among those aged 24-44, according to the audience measuring service. As illustrated below, only those aged 45-54 are pecking out more emails today than they were a year ago.

The reason, of course, is that a growing number of people are communicating via Facebook and/or text messages on their mobile phones. Many, of course, also are chatting on the Facebook apps on their smart phones.

The rapid shift in one-on-one communication is not the only disruptive trend noted in the comScore study.

Traditional portals like Yahoo, MSN and AOL are “conceding ground to Facebook and other social networks,” said comScore. Noting that portals represented 16.7% of time on site in December vs. 16.6% for Facebook and its brethren, comScore said social sites are on track to “soon declare supremacy over portals.”

Putting its growing traffic to good use, Facebook last year became the top publisher of digital display advertising. Facebook ran more than 1.3 trillion ad impressions, as compared with 529 billion at Yahoo, 215 billion at Microsoft and 174 billion at Google.

While Google remains the king of search advertising, comScore notes its vulnerability, saying:

“Advertising on Facebook – which combines many of the attributes of search such as granular targeting, small ad formats and self-purchased ad buys – presents a unique offering for many marketers looking to bridge their search and display advertising.”


There Goes Your Privacy

January 25, 2012

Mountain View’s Chocolate Factory is putting its vast userbase on notice of major changes to its privacy policies.

Come 1 March the 350 million people worldwide who have Gmail accounts, for example, will no longer be able to use that service in isolation of other Google products they browse to online.

That’s because the company’s Terms of Service are changing.

Some will argue that Google is merely doing some neat housekeeping by cutting and shutting the majority of its 70 privacy policies into one clean explanation of what will happen with the information users input into the company’s array of products.

Others might note that these privacy tweaks are coming ahead of any public antitrust battle Google potentially faces on both sides of the Atlantic where formal regulatory probes of the world’s largest ad broker are already well underway.

“The main change is for users with Google Accounts,” Google’s privacy, product and engineering wonk Alma Whitten said.

“Our new Privacy Policy makes clear that, if you’re signed in, we may combine information you’ve provided from one service with information from other services. In short, we’ll treat you as a single user across all our products, which will mean a simpler, more intuitive Google experience.”

Read the rest of this entry »


Vice Adm. Venlet Requests Production Slow Down for F-35 Lightning II

December 7, 2011

Building jet while ground and flight testing was ongoing was a “miscalculation” according to Venlet

The problems and delays with the F-35 fleet continue to mount. AOL Defense reports that testing and analysis have turned up so many potential areas of issue in the airframe of F-35 fighters that Vice Adm. David Venlet has said that he feels production needs to slow down. Venlet notes that the number of hot spots and potential cracks found in the airframe over last year have gone up significantly. Slowing the rate of production would allow testing to continue and parts that need redesigned to be found and fixed before the cost of retrofitting them to existing aircraft mounts.

 Venlet said, “The analyzed hot spots that have arisen in the last 12 months or so in the program have surprised us at the amount of change and at the cost. Most of them are little ones, but when you bundle them all up, package them, and look at where they are in the airplane and how hard they are to get at after you buy the jet, the cost burden of that is what sucks the wind out of your lungs.”

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