1000 Dayes: Longest Spell Of No US Land Falling Hurricanes Since Civil War

June 11, 2011

It’s Official: ‘It has now been 1000 days since any hurricane hit the U.S., the longest spell since before the Civil War’ Visit Site

Steve Goddard Writes: It has now been 1000 days since any hurricane hit the US, the longest spell since before the Civil War.


“Tiny Tims” — Stating The Obvious

August 24, 2009

‘Tiny Tims’ are a nickname for Hurricanes-Tropical storms which are well you know, tiny, and would probably have escaped detection before satellites were watching.

One thing for sure, it’s not global warming, man caused or otherwise, causing the higher numbers for named storms … But it might be global cooling lowering the real numbers. The last hurricane, ‘Bill’ was run off from the USA coastline by a cold front, that eventually stretched from New England to Tampa Florida. And it’s still August!!!

Keeping the hurricane record pure, is not an easy task. The very latest observation satellites of the last years are of such capability that they swamp out the old ‘ship observations’, way back when

For instance, when the 1900 Galveston hurricane hit Galveston Texas, as many as 12,000 people were killed, the warning that there was even a hurricane coming ashore, was measured in hours — The hurricane warning system was very poor back then. This causes a problem with record keeping, when trying to equate storms over a hundred years, storm trends and predictions can be way off. Comparing modern hurricane-tropical storm detection and the old way, is difficult, if not near impossible, making chart comparisons very iffy(same can be said about tornadoes).

Now a NOAA led team is stating the obvious:

A NOAA-led team of scientists has found that the apparent increase in the number of tropical storms and hurricanes since the late 19th and early 20th centuries is likely attributable to improvements in observational tools and analysis techniques that better detect short-lived storms.

Short-lived Tropical Storm Chantal forms 210 miles south of Halifax, Nova Scotia on July 31, 2007.

Tiny Tim — Short-lived Tropical Storm Chantal forms 210 miles south of Halifax, Nova Scotia on July 31, 2007.

High resolution (Credit: NOAA)

The new study, reported in the online edition of the American Meteorological Society’s peer-reviewed Journal of Climate, shows that short-lived tropical storms and hurricanes, defined as lasting two days or less, have increased from less than one per year to about five per year from 1878 to 2008.

“The recent jump in the number of short-lived systems is likely a consequence of improvements in observational tools and analysis techniques,” said Chris Landsea, science and operations officer at NOAA’s National Hurricane Center in Miami, and lead author on the study. “The team is not aware of any natural variability or greenhouse warming-induced climate change that would affect the short-lived tropical storms exclusively.”

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